Alcohol and Tattoos: Drinking Before and After a Tattoos | InkedWay
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Alcohol and Tattoos: The Effects of Drinking on Your Body and Tattoo Healing Process

If you're like most people, you probably enjoy a cold beer or glass of wine every now and then. But what about after getting a tattoo? Is it okay to drink alcohol? Will it thin your blood and make the healing process more difficult? No alcohol is allowed while you're getting a tattoo. In this article, we will explore the effects of alcohol on tattoos and provide some advice on how to avoid any problems with your new tattoo.

The effects of alcohol on the body and how it can affect the healing process of tattoos

When you drink alcohol, it is absorbed into your bloodstream and travels to every part of the body. This can cause several different problems for all people but for those who have recently gotten a tattoo or for those who are going to get inked especially.

There are a few reasons why alcohol can have a negative effect on the body and fresh tattoos. First of all, alcohol can thin your blood and make you more prone to bleeding. This is not ideal when you are trying to heal a fresh tattoo. Secondly, alcohol can dehydrate you, which can also slow down the overall healing process. Finally, drinking alcohol can also interfere with the absorption of nutrients, which is necessary for the healing. So, if you are trying to give your new tattoo the best chance to heal properly, it is best to avoid drinking alcohol altogether.

Some tattooed people can say that drinking alcohol after getting inked doesn't have any negative effects on their bodies. But this is because they think it's okay to drink while they are healing and don't realize how much damage it can cause them in the long run. Moreover, if in one case, alcohol did not harm someone's fresh tattoo, it does not mean that nothing bad will happen to your just inked tattoo. In some cases, it is best to avoid drinking alcohol altogether when you have a new tattoo until it heals.

Let's see why does it so important.

Drinking After a Tattoo

Drinking After a Tattoo.

Alcohol can slow down the healing process of your tattoo

Drinking too much after getting a tattoo done would be that alcohol weakens your immune system. If you're already harmed your skin with something like tattooing then it might take longer for your body to heal itself after being tattooed, which means that any infections could get into your body easier before you get better! Alcohol may increase the risk of infection because bacteria can enter through these areas more easily due to weakened defenses caused by drinking too much alcohol.

You don't think there's anything wrong with that? It might be. But it's also most likely that your tattoo won't be as bright, long-lasting, and clear as it might have been if you'd given up the idea of drinking after your tattoo session.

Alcohol consumption after getting tattoos can cause the skin to dry out and crack, which increases the likelihood of infection

Moreover, alcohol has dehydrating effects and can make your tattoo fade faster than usual. After getting tattoos, consuming alcohol might lead to tattooed skin dryness and cracking, making infections more likely.

Drinking alcohol can make your blood thinner

Drinking too much could increase blood flow which may cause the ink to bleed out sooner than expected! It is normal for there to be some blood and bloody debris from the wound, but increasing the amount of this debris will accelerate and increase the displacement of the tattoo ink. So why risk ruining all that hard work just because you had one beer?

Alcohol can make it harder for you to make decisions

The reason why it can make it harder to make decisions is that alcohol blocks the way serotonin transmit signals from its receptors to brain cells responsible for mood regulation. Alcohol also increases cortisol levels which exhaust the prefrontal cortex of the brain that controls emotional responses and any impulse control possessed whatsoever. So you can accidentally scrape or scratch the freshly made tattoo, get it wet, or forget about the necessary care for it. All this, obviously, carries additional risks.

Drinking Before Getting Tattoos

Drinking Before Getting Tattoos.

Excessive bleeding increases the risk of infection

As we said before, alcohol thins your blood. This is also a reason to exclude any alcohol at least 24 hours before you plan to get a tattoo. The more diluted it becomes with alcohol content, the less able is it to clot if you get injured. Excessive bleeding increases the risk for infection as well as delaying healing time due to poor circulation around wounded areas of skin like where there has been tattooing done recently!

The tattoo artist will refuse to provide you with the service

If you have been drinking alcohol before getting a tattoo, the tattoo artist will cancel your entry on tattoo sesion. This is because alcohol can significantly increase the risks associated with the whole tattooing process, and no tattoo artist wants to be responsible for any potential damage or health complications that may arise from it.

If you think that alcohol will help you reduce the pain of your tattoo, in a way you are right. After all, a tattoo artist actually has no right to give you a tattoo according to the law if you came to the appointment drunk. A decent tattoo artist or tattoo studio will cancel your appointment and probably won't refund your prepayment, if there was one. So do you still want to drink alcohol before a tattoo?

Tattoo artists typically recommend waiting until the skin has healed completely before drinking alcohol again

Most professional tattoo artists recommend waiting until the skin has healed completely before drinking again in order to avoid any potential risks. Although one beer may not seem like much, it can have detrimental consequences on your body and tattoo healing process. Let's see what professional tattoo artists have to say about it.

For example, Allure asked tattoo artists Baz Shailes and Sara Antoinette Martin about their clients' alcohol consumption before or after a tattoo session. They noted that they would not tattoo a visibly drunk person.

"Drinking alcohol before you get a tattoo is a bad idea. It inhibits judgment,” says Jon Reiter of Solid State Tattoos.

Tyson Weed, tattoo artist from Tempe, tells Romper that "Alcohol thins your blood, dehydrates you and makes you urinate often,".

How to avoid any problems with your new tattoo

How to avoid any problems with your new tattoo.
  • If you're going to drink alcohol, do it in moderation

    If you're going to drink alcohol at all, make sure that you only have one or two drinks and wait until the next day before getting your tattoo. This will help minimize any risks associated with drinking alcohol.

  • Be extra vigilant about hygiene and wound care

    Following good hygiene practices is always important, but it's especially crucial after getting a new tattoo. For a complete list of recommendations for tattoo aftercare, we described earlier. Make sure to clean the area regularly with antibacterial soap and dry it off completely before putting on any ointment or cream. Wound care is also essential for proper healing - keep your tattoo clean by washing it twice daily with the best antibacterial soap, applying an antibiotic ointment throughout the day (at least three times per week), changing bandages regularly without any residue of blood or fluids on them from previous uses. Regulary using good quality aftecare tattoo products helps to heal the tattoo faster and healthier.

  • Keep the area clean

    Gently wash the tattooed area with warm water and a mild soap twice a day. Do not scrub or rub the area, as this can damage the fresh ink and cause irritation.

  • Avoid the sun

    Keep your tattoo out of direct sunlight for at least three weeks after getting a tattoo. The sun can harm and damage tattoos, as well as cause scarring.

  • Do not scratch or pick at the tattoo

    Your new tattoo is essentially a fresh wound and should be treated as such. Avoid picking, scratching, rubbing, or otherwise disturbing your tattooed area for several weeks after getting a tattoo to ensure proper healing. By the way, to comply with this recommendation, when you are drunk is extremely difficult! This is another reason not to drink until your tattoo is fully healed.

Final words

There seem to be some standard things that come up when you search about alcohol and tattoos: alcohol makes the skin swell up; alcohol slows down blood coagulation; alcohol thins your blood and make it harder for your body to heal; alcohol can cause some problems together with tattoos. Does that mean if you're getting tattooed, then don't drink alcohol beforehand or afterward because it might cause problems during healing time? Or maybe just don't get drunk before getting a tattoo done so as not to make yourself vulnerable while under the influence of alcohol. It seems like there are many different opinions out there on whether drinking alcohol will affect how well a tattoo heals and how long it takes for that process to happen.

After reading this article, I hope you have learned more about tattoos and their relationship with alcohol consumption. Tattoos can be a great way to express yourself but they also come at an increased risk when combined together with drinking alcoholic beverages such as beer or wine. So enjoy your favorite beverage responsibly – when the tattoo is already healed!